The aesthetics business is booming right now and the rise in so called “Selfie Surgery” is fuelling that boom.  From minor ‘tweakments’ to full scale surgery, it’s never been more normal, or accepted to admit that you’ve had work done.  What was once only accessible to the rich and famous has hit the mainstream and I can guarantee that you already know someone who’s dabbled in the world of aesthetic treatment, whether you know it or not.  It’s no longer about looking ‘done’, just as fashion has trends, so does the beauty industry and within that, the aesthetic industry.  In the 90’s Pamela Anderson appeared on the scene with her surgically enhanced breasts and the silicone era was born, today’s version is Kylie Jenner, with her plump lips and crease free face, she’s the poster child for an industry that we hold up as the Holy Grail.

two images of Kylie Jenner side by side showing the pre and post effects of her facial aesthetic treatments

But can we really turn back time, or at least hit the snooze button for a little while, using just a needle?  Well, yes as it turns out.  When you seek out advice from an Aesthetic Doctor it’s completely bespoke to your face structure and needs, it’s not like taking a prescription medication which is prescribed universally for a particular set of symptoms.  That’s the reason it’s important to do your research if you are planning on looking into taking the injectables route, the Safety in Beauty Campaign seeks to highlight the difficulties in regulating the industry and ensuring that practice is safe.  Nobody wants to end up on Botched Bodies and there are a few things you can do to prevent that from happening:

1. Only seek treatment from a qualified doctor, nurse prescriber or dentist to ensure that your practitioner has a medical background and a knowledge of facial structure and dynamics.

2. Beauty Therapists, no matter what they claim, are not trained medically, and if something does go wrong, they can’t prescribe the product used to treat and dissolve filler.  In fact there is a national campaign gathering momentum to call for a halt on this type of medical practice taking place outside of a medical environment.

3. Have a clear idea of what it is you want to achieve, rather than the product you want to use.  Just because a product worked for someone else, it doesn’t mean it’s the right one for you, your practitioner will look at your facial structure and help you to decide.  Sometimes filler can be used to slim down other areas, it’s not always injectable toxin you need.

4. Be prepared to hear “No”.  A good aesthetic doctor won’t be afraid to turn you away if treatment really isn’t necessary.

5. Don’t have unrealistic expectations, if you’re 46, you won’t leave the clinic looking 26.

I’m no stranger to the odd tweakment, I’ve been having Botox injections for almost two years now, I was probably late to the game at my age (the average age that women to begin aesthetic treatment in the UK is now just 22) but it’s something I’m happy with and planning to continue.  I have an inherited forehead line that completely disappears around two weeks post treatment and looking back at pictures from as little as two years ago and seeing how much I’ve managed to change and control that particular facial dynamic using a minimally invasive procedure is seriously impressive.  To me anyway.  The fashion industry is cut-throat, youth is its currency and everywhere you look there are examples of good and bad aesthetic treatment, the chances are, you only ever notice the bad.

One of the most important things to remember if you are making inquiries about possible aesthetic treatment, whether it’s dermal filler, lip filler or wrinkle relaxing treatments, my advice is the same:  cheap treatment doesn’t mean you’re getting a bargain.  Seriously, those FaceBook ads you see advertising lip filler or wrinkle relaxing treatments for an unbelievably affordable price, can come with a hefty hidden cost.  You’re literally putting your face on the line here, the first thing people see when they look at you, your shop front as it were.  Do research, look at previous work, ask about medical qualifications and whether they’re equipped to manage you as a case should things go wrong.  If somebody claims that things “never go wrong” alarm bells should be ringing.  Like any surgical procedure in a hospital, aesthetic treatments, although minimally invasive, are still medical procedures and yes, things can occasionally go wrong.  What you need to be sure of, is that if you happen to be one of those people in the minority, are they able to treat you effectively.

The biggest change in my own face has been through growing in my eyebrows with the assistance of a (private) prescription only product called Lumigan.  You’ll have seen me raving about Lumigan on here and on social media but I can’t begin to communicate just how effective it is, without showing you.

The picture on the left is pre-botox and mega brows (obvs) and was taken in 2016 as I was leaving the gym, the picture on the right was taken a few days ago (2018), also leaving the gym.  Neither image is posed for or altered in any way.  Big difference right?  See my point is, if you are planning on traversing the aesthetics slope, then the best way to do it is to look hard at yourself and only treat the bits that matter, don’t jump on the bandwagon to follow a trend just because somebody else is doing it.  Aesthetics is about you, and you alone.  You can’t change yourself to be someone else.

Of course, you could always adopt the Ru Paul mantra “If you don’t love yourself, how in the hell you gonna love somebody else?” and embrace what you already have….

P x

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